W. T. Waggoner Estate

Waggoner Ranch
 The Nation's Largest Ranch Under One Fence
.

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Wilson Friberg, Receiver
         
     

A  Tribute to the Art Work

of

Electra Waggoner Biggs
November 08, 1912 - April 23, 2001


Electra Waggoner Biggs an heiress of the Waggoner Ranch
 stands next to the sculptor of Will Rogers on his horse Soap Suds.  This replica graces the grounds of Texas Tech University in Lubbock.  Her original of the statue was a gift donated to the city of
Ft. Worth by Amon G. Carter.

As stated in an article from the "New York Journal and American", Tuesday, April 12, 1938, Electra Waggoner explained that she had wanted to be a sculptress ever since she was a kid.   Even when she was going to finishing school in New York, she was studying art on the side.  Later she took a special course at Columbia, living in the Village and working with sculptors.  Afterwards, she spent a year in Paris, at the Sorbonne.

Below are just a few samples of Mrs. Biggs' work.


"Enigma"
Electra's first model was her maid, a woman half Negro and half American Indian.  While in Paris, Electra chiseled the head out of black Belgian marble and exhibited it at a Paris art salon causing much favorable comment.  Later she took "Enigma" back to New York and exhibited it in a 31 piece show of her work. 

As early as 1945 Electra Waggoner Bigg's art work had been exhibited in Los Angeles, in the World's Fair in New York and Washington as well as Paris.

              Harry S. Truman           
         President Truman posed for Mrs. Biggs.  
He set her at ease while she created the likeness, with his genial, Midwestern wit.  
After completion the bronze portrait was the proud possession of the president's fellow Missourians.     
                   

Tony Hazelwood 
A Waggoner Ranch Cowboy.
 
A collection of Mrs. Biggs art may be viewed at the Red River Valley Museum
in Vernon, Texas .  For information regarding the museum please visit www.rrvm.org.